U.S. doctors online nowAsk doctors free

Doctor Q&A for Dr. Don Buford

A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Don Buford
Orthopedic Surgery 28 years experience
General averages..: Patients move their elbow, wrist and hand immediately. No active shoulder motion for about 6 weeks. Between 6 weeks and 3 months patients are in therapy working on getting motion back to normal. After 3 months motion is close to normal and primary therapy is for strength. These are general and vary with patient age and size of tear sometimes. Return to heavy lifting and sports at 6 mos
A 21-year-old female asked:
Dr. Don Buford
Orthopedic Surgery 28 years experience
Can be normal but...: X-rays are a good initial imaging modality but will not reveal the capsular and labral damage that often goes along with a shoulder dislocation if it is traumatic. As long and the shoulder is stable thru a functional range then some discomfort at 5 days is expected. Beyond several weeks, if you have significant discomfort a surgeon may wish to get more diagnostic information with a MRI scan.
1 thank
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Don Buford
Orthopedic Surgery 28 years experience
Trauma, pain, weak: Any significant shoulder dysfunction that persists despite resting the shoulder for a while shoulder probably be evaluated for a more significant injury or at least to get additional treatment options for may be effective. With any serious traumatic event like a dislocation or obvious deformity then a consultation with a surgeon is more urgent. Usually complaints are pain, weakness, stiffness...
A 32-year-old member asked:
Dr. Don Buford
Orthopedic Surgery 28 years experience
Depends on the surg: There are a very large number of different shoulder surgeries so recovery time absolutely cannot be determined as a single time for all shoulder surgery. For many ligament and tendon repairs around the shoulder, most patients are able to return to their work and recreational activities by 6 months. Your surgeon can best tell you the expected recovery time for any procedures that they recommend.
1 thank
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Don Buford
Orthopedic Surgery 28 years experience
Reduce the joint: Initial treatment is to reduce the dislocation, after which most are placed in a sling. It is important to determine how much structural damage has been done so an evaluation by an orthopedic surgeon is recommended.....this does not mean surgery is required but there are some associated injuries and factors that may influence your treatment choices and your decision as to what is best for you.
A 36-year-old member asked:
Dr. Don Buford
Orthopedic Surgery 28 years experience
Injury or congenital: There are 2 broad categories of shoulder instability. Some patients have a traumatic injury that leads to a shoulder dislocation or subluxation and sometimes recurrent instability. Other patients are born with "loose" shoulders (and often other loose joints) and may have shoulder dislocations without significant trauma. Without knowing a little more history it would be difficult to determine for u
1 thank
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Don Buford
Orthopedic Surgery 28 years experience
Rest, rehab, NSAIDs: Initial treatment for shoulder impingement is aimed at stopping activities that worsen the symptoms. Rehab involves exercises that strengthen the rotator cuff and scapular stabilizing muscles. NSAID treatment may help treat the soft tissue inflammation and decrease a patient's discomfort. Sometimes if oral anti-inflammatories are not effective, a clinician may suggest a steroid shot.
1 thank
A 34-year-old member asked:
Dr. Don Buford
Orthopedic Surgery 28 years experience
A cartilage tear: The labrum is a structure attached to the edge of the bony socket, the glenoid, that has several functions. Anteriorly the labrum serves as an attachment site for the anterior shoulder ligaments and helps to provide stability to the shoulder. At the top of the shoulder the long head of the biceps tendon inserts into the labrum and tears here are called SLAP lesions.
1 thank
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Don Buford
Orthopedic Surgery 28 years experience
PT and maybe surgery: The initial choice is usually for physical therapy to strengthen the rotator cuff muscles and to strengthen the scapular stabilizing muscles. If there is significant pathology or the patient continues to haves symptoms after trying to rehab the shoulder, then surgery may be an option to repair the injuries.
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Don Buford
Orthopedic Surgery 28 years experience
Motion, strength....: Chief complaints of patients with significant rotator cuff tears include pain (with motion and at night), loss of strength, loss of motion, and with more time sometimes arthritis can develop (rotator cuff arthropathy).
90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions, provide medical advice, write prescriptions, and more.
Answer emailed
in 24 hours or less