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Dr. Bradford Landry

Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine
Rochester, MN
13 years experience male

Locations

Mayo Clinic

Rochester, MN

Address

200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, United States
Directions

About

Bio

Dr. Bradford Landry is a board certified Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation physician at Mayo Clinic. He completed his training in both Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and subsequently Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine at Mayo Clinic. He has a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine degree from the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine and Master of Science degrees in both Physical Therapy and Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine. Dr. Landry is actively involved in ongoing projects at Mayo Clinic that span a range of practice interests from chronic pain to spina bifida, while his primary specialty interests focus on chronic pediatric pain, exercise in children, spasticity management and hypermobility.

Specialties
Doctors may have more than one area of specialty interest. Board certification in a specialty area means the doctor has completed formal training and has practice experience in that specialty, and has passed the certification examination from the corresponding accredited medical specialty board.

Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine

Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Doctor Q&A

55 Answers
25 Agrees
The number of answers this doctor has agreed with.
A 16-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Pain rehab clinic: An interdisciplinary treatment center for pain rehabilitation would be best. Depending on the center you could meet with a pain physician, rehab physi... Read More
A female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Be careful: There are typically poor long-term results for surgical "correction" of hypermobile joints. Increasing strength around hypermobile joints, increasing ... Read More
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Rheum and PMR: Hypermobility is usually best treated by an exercise program focusing on improving proprioception, dynamic control of joint movement, and aerobic capa... Read More
A 45-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Usually benign: Fasciculations does not = ALS. They are more likely a symptom of excess caffeine, lack of sleep, anxiety, stress, etc. Diagnosis for ALS does include ... Read More
A 40-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Mild form: Occulta is the mildest form of Spina bifida. Patients usually have no signs, symptoms or neurological problems. Can be found on X-ray due to a small s... Read More
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
EDS-HT = JHS: EDS-hypermobility type (EDS-HT) is considered synonymous with JHS. Do not confuse these with other types of EDS as they have very different presentati... Read More
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Sort of: There is some evidence that those with hypermobilty are at increased risk of sprains and strains, although there also exists some evidence to the cont... Read More
A 18-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Yes, sort of...: People can have hypermobility in their hips but "popping them out" in terms of dislocating takes significant force, causing severe pain and difficulty... Read More
A 31-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
An apple a day: I'm assuming you mean they fall asleep often after prolonged positioning, as this is probably the most likely cause for your symptoms. Those who are t... Read More
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Poorly understood dx: JHS is symptomatic hypermobility. Many individuals who have hypermobility never have pain or require any treatment. When hypermobility is found associ... Read More
A 60-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
No: There is no good evidence that orthotics will ever "correct" an arch. If they do reduce pain, then continuing to wear them when upright would be encou... Read More
A 42-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
A few different docs: Medical genetics physician may be helpful in diagnosis if there is concern about an EDS type other than type 3. A physical medicine and rehabilitation... Read More
A 17-year-old male asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
PT usually best: RICE is appropriate but best to see a physical therapist for a good rehab program. This can turn into a very nagging problem if not treated appropriat... Read More
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Exercise: Evidence on effective treatments in JHS is variable but overall it seems that an exercise program focused on increasing aerobic capacity, maintaining ... Read More
A 27-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Workup and PT: There is no good evidence that JHS in and of itself will cause such significant pain. With that said, many people with JHS do present with chronic pai... Read More
A 32-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Exercise: Evidence on effective treatments in JHS is variable but overall it seems that a program focused on increasing aerobic capacity, maintaining good dynam... Read More
A 32-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
No: Blue sclerae are typically associated with Osteogenesis imperfecta, not BJHS. There are extremely rare cases of Ehlers-Danlos (dermatosparaxis type an... Read More
A 25-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Dysautonomia: Dysautonomia is fairly common in many patients diagnosed with EDS, which could perhaps explain the cold hands/feet and tingling. Mechanism isn't exact... Read More
A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Rheum and PMR: Hypermobility is usually best treated by an exercise program focusing on improving proprioception, dynamic control of joint movement, and aerobic capa... Read More
A 35-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Brighton Criteria: Most physicians will utilize the Brighton Criteria for diagnosis of JHS. Various criteria are needed for a diagnosis and the major criteria include: ... Read More
A 29-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
No: Not exactly sure what you're asking, but I am inclined to say no. The mere act of driving would not worsen the condition and should not typically exac... Read More
A 33-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Probably unrelated: There is no evidence that individuals with EDS have any increased difficulty with sedation related to anesthesia. There are however risks associated w... Read More
A 25-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Persistence: Guidance from a PT together with a dedicated home exercise program is the best option for management in these cases. There is limited evidence on the ... Read More
A 34-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Allodynia: Allodynia is a type of pain due to a non-painful stimulus (pain from something that doesn't usually cause pain). Both allodynia and hyperalgesia (incr... Read More
A 24-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
No: Fasciculations are not an early indicator of ALS. They are more likely a symptom of excess caffeine, lack of sleep, anxiety, stress, etc. Diagnosis fo... Read More
A 31-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Treat the poop 1st: Constipation doesn't typically cause headaches but can lead to nausea. Constipation and headaches are often seen together in various conditions though... Read More
A 32-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Exam will be needed: Very long differential diagnosis for any kind of back pain. Best to see your physician in person since a physical exam will be key in determining the ... Read More
A 32-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Normal finding: The fourth ventricle should be midline in the posterior fossa and would be considered a normal finding. My best guess is an MRI was performed to rule ... Read More
A 28-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Neurology evaluation: Consultation with a neurologist who specializes in headaches would be your best bet. Severe headaches can turn into a very chronic and debilitating co... Read More
A 24-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Never say never: I am always skeptical of those who say "always" or "never" in medicine. There is (almost) always an exception to everything, and I (nearly) never say ... Read More
A 17-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Eval needed: There's no one size fits all answer for most headaches. It depends on many factors including type, frequency, duration, other symptoms, medical histor... Read More
A 18-year-old male asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
With OCP yes: There is no good evidence that individuals with EDS have any increased difficulty in conceiving. There are however scattered anecdotal reports of spon... Read More
A 16-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Dysautonomia: Dysautonomia is fairly common in many patients with EDS, which could perhaps explain the numbness and tingling. Mechanism isn't exactly clear but is p... Read More
A 21-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
See your physician: There is limited good evidence that joint hypermobility causes back pain. Although there is some thought that due to increased laxity, individuals may... Read More
A 17-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Perseverance: Depending on the type of scoliosis, severity and progression of symptoms, further evaluation by an orthopedic surgeon and/or physiatrist would helpful... Read More
A 39-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
EMG to check nerves: An EMG/NCS was done to assess the function of your nerves and muscles in your arms. Neurologists (and Physiatrists) are doctors who perform these test... Read More
A 60-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
It depends...: That's actually a difficult question to answer since the clinical presentation of congenital hypermobility varies widely. In general though (and separ... Read More
A 29-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
They can be: POTS and GERD, as well as other autonomic type dysfunctions are fairly common in patients with various presentations of hypermobility. POTS in particu... Read More
A 24-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Get an EMG: Evaluation by a neurologist or PM&R physician would be helpful. An EMG may be needed to determine precisely where your sensations are likely comin... Read More
A 30-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Concerned? Maybe PT: Some babies take some time to get used to tummy time so be patient. If torticollis is a concern, see your physician or find a PMR doc who can assess h... Read More
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Not exactly: There is limited evidence that heart valve problems are related to JHS, however, it is a well known feature of other conditions associated with hyperm... Read More
A 41-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Yes, but not EDS-HT: Functional bowel disorders such as IBS are more commonly related to EDS-HT. Gastric telangiectasias are probably more likely to be related to vascular... Read More
A 21-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Usually not directly: Many people with EDS-hypermobility type present also with complaints of headaches. Headaches are not however, a diagnostic feature of EDS-HT. Increase... Read More
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Beighton scale: If pain is present in the setting of hypermobility, most physicians will utilize the Brighton Criteria for diagnosis of JHS. If an individual has no p... Read More
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Poorly understood dx: JHS is symptomatic hypermobility. Many individuals who have hypermobility never have pain or require any treatment. When hypermobility is found associ... Read More
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Sort of: There is some evidence that those with hypermobilty are at increased risk of sprains and strains, although there also exists some evidence to the cont... Read More
A 42-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Neurologist eval: It's unclear to me how you are sure it's not a neuropathy. EMG? Prior work up? There are a variety of causes for burning feet and most should be evalu... Read More
A 35-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Neuro eval: Chiari malformations are common findings in Spina bifida. Occasionally this can present with abnormal sensations in the arms and legs, even later in l... Read More
A 60-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
No, but...: There is no good evidence that orthotics will ever "correct" an arch. Not wearing these would not be expected to worsen any "hypermobi... Read More
A 21-year-old male asked:
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine 13 years experience
Possibly: With age hypermobility decreases, so someone previously diagnosed with hypermobility may fall below a diagnostic threshold later in life. However, in ... Read More

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Testimonials
Recommendations and Thank you notes are endorsements given from patients or other doctors.

3
Recommendations
44
Thank you notes
HealthTap member
Mar 30, 2015
Dr. Landry is an amazing doctor! #nationaldoctorsday2015 #virtualflower2
HealthTap member
Mar 31, 2015
Dr. Landry is an amazing doctor! #nationaldoctorsday2015 #virtualflower1
HealthTap member
Mar 31, 2015
Dr. Landry is an amazing doctor! #nationaldoctorsday2015 #virtualflower1
HealthTap member
This was very helpful. Thanks! Been tested for neuropathy and gout. Both negative. Physiatrist? Neurologist would be final choice. Had prior knee pain before this started. TY!
HealthTap member
Thank you, your answer was very helpful! I also just found out I have lyme disease. I know why I have issues no
HealthTap member
Thanks for your quick reply! My doc has said it's a trapped nerve although I don't think it is

Education & Training

Medical/Graduate school

New York Institute of Technology New York College of Osteopathic Medicine, NY
Graduated 2009MD

Residency

MAYO CLINIC
Completed 2013

Awards

National Student D.O. of the Year, Council of Osteopathic Student Government Presidents
HealthTap Founding Doctor
90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions, provide medical advice, write prescriptions, and more.
Answer emailed
in 24 hours or less