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Doctor Q&A for Dr. Cynthia Archer

A member asked:
Dr. Cynthia Archer
Internal Medicine 19 years experience
Novel means "new": That's all there is to it. There are many different coronaviruses in this family of viruses and several are known to infect Humans. This one is both genetically distinct, it's manifestations in illness are new, and it has only recently been identified as a new Human disease/virus/pathogen. It's really that simple.
A 63-year-old male asked:
Dr. Cynthia Archer
Internal Medicine 19 years experience
This is a question: For your cardiologist ideally or your general practioner. Complicated situations such as this cannot be managed via this forum. Best wishes to you and here's hoping you're feeling good again soon!
A 34-year-old female asked:
Dr. Cynthia Archer
Internal Medicine 19 years experience
Go see a doctor :): Fortunately in the UK there is a NHS that takes care of everyone. Without an exam it's not possible to be certain, but your symptoms fit with either yeast vaginitis, or a urinary infection or possibly both. It would also be important to ask about the possibility of pregnancy amongst other things. A urine test and pelvic exam would she light on what is causing your symtpoms. Best wishes to you!
A 39-year-old male asked:
Dr. Cynthia Archer
Internal Medicine 19 years experience
Your doc should help: I'm very sorry to hear that you are going through this. Please contact your doctor for help. You should not be abandoned by your physician. If you cant get answers on the phone, I suggest you to the office in person. Have a frank conversation about the bind this puts you in, and if your doc is not understanding, move on. You deserve great care.
A 21-year-old female asked:
Dr. Cynthia Archer
Internal Medicine 19 years experience
Talk to your primary: For most weight loss "pills" (or medically supervised weight loss) you will need to see a physician in real life. Most are controlled substances, although not all. Weight loss medical regimens have to be tailored to the individual case and weight should be closely montiored while on therapy. All of the options have side effects which need to be watched as well. Your doctor can definitely help. :)
A 19-year-old female asked:
Dr. Cynthia Archer
Internal Medicine 19 years experience
Time to see a doctor: There are too many possible explanations to list here. You need a doctor to take a verbal history, do physical exam and then some blood and urine as well as possibly stool tests. It woud be worth your time to go get seen as soon as possible, see if you can go to the clinic for a walk in or same day apointment. best of luck and hope you are feeling better soon!
1 thank
A female asked:
Dr. Cynthia Archer
Internal Medicine 19 years experience
Good question.: I suppose that is predicated on understanding what you mean by "real doctor" and also what significance that carries for you. Could this be a computer answering you? Not yet. If you don't believe me ask Siri that question and see what it says. Could I be someone posing as a "real doctor"? That is difficult to do. There are elaborate verification systems for US doctors. Frauds don't last long here.
A 34-year-old female asked:
Dr. Cynthia Archer
Internal Medicine 19 years experience
Call your physician.: This is a question best asked of the doctor who has been taking care of your anxiety, and who knows you personally. They will want to know you are struggling and will have some helpful suggestions to get you through this safely. If it is after hours, there is a provider on call for the practice who can help. Mixing medicines can be dangerous. Call 911 if you're thinking of self harm or suicide.
A 28-year-old male asked:
Dr. Cynthia Archer
Internal Medicine 19 years experience
Are you having pain?: If it is not painful, then there is nothing to worry about. Most people have some amount of crepitus (which is noise that a joint makes when it moves) in their knees especially. If you have not suffered an injury, if the joint is stable, e.g. not giving out when you walk and if it is painless, there is unlikley to be cause for concern. Maybe mention it to your doctor at your next physical exam.
A 16-year-old female asked:
Dr. Cynthia Archer
Internal Medicine 19 years experience
ANA is nonspecific: A positive ANA by itself is not useful diagnostically. As with most things in medicine it has to be interpreted in context. Therefore a positive ANA alone does not mean a diagosis of lupus is established. As to your second question, yes it is possible for a positive ANA to later test negative. I suggest talking with your doctor in person about this in your case specifically, and why it was tested.
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