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Doctor Q&A for Dr. Mark Gromisch

A 34-year-old female asked:
Dr. Mark Gromisch
Gastroenterology 38 years experience
Abdominal pain: A lot of problems and only 400 characters for an answer. You need evaluation for H Pylori infection, medication to control gastric acid, a HIDA scan to assess gallbladder function with or without CCK if you have gallstones or not. You also need evaluation for kidney stones as this can commonly result in pain radiating down the flanks. You also need to be assessed for spine problems
A 32-year-old female asked:
Dr. Mark Gromisch
Gastroenterology 38 years experience
Ear pain: Sounds like a upper respiratory infection or severe reflux with a blocked eustacian tube which is causing a build up of pressure behind the ear. You need to be further evaluated. In many cases a antihistamine such as Zyrtec (cetirizine) may help with the ear pain
A 24-year-old female asked:
Dr. Mark Gromisch
Gastroenterology 38 years experience
Hypokalemia: Your potassium is slightly low. Prepopik usually will not worsen hypokalemia significantly. I would drink some pedialyte during the prep. Remember that good fluid intake will give you a better bowel cleansing
A 19-year-old male asked:
Dr. Mark Gromisch
Gastroenterology 38 years experience
Aortic dissection: Be careful what you read online. Aortic dissection generally occurs in people decades older than you with long standing medical conditions. More likely you had some GI infection or were constipated. Relax
A 37-year-old male asked:
Dr. Mark Gromisch
Gastroenterology 38 years experience
Reflux: basically, reflux means that gastric contents are refluxed into the esophagus. This can be exacerbated by fatty meals, tobacco, alcohol, coffee, tea, peppermint, licorice. Acid levels can be normal or even low, but can burn the esophagus. Treatment includes acid blockers such as PPI's orH2 blockers. Sometimes the reflux can be caused by bile, which is non acidic and is treated with sucralfate
A 22-year-old male asked:
Dr. Mark Gromisch
Gastroenterology 38 years experience
Hunger pain: you may have gastritis. The fact that eating helps may be because the food is buffering the stomach acid. Try an antiacid or an OTC medication such as Zantac (ranitidine) for a few days to see I'd it helps. If your symptoms worsen on medication or persist, this could indicate a possible infection of the stomach or ulcer. This needs further evaluation.
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A 47-year-old female asked:
Dr. Mark Gromisch
Gastroenterology 38 years experience
Gallbladder dysfunct: it could be gallbladder dysfunction. This usually occurs after eating a fatty meal. A sonogram may be helpful but often not diagnostic. A HIDA scan with a gallbladder ejection study can often be very helpful in making the diagnosis
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A 22-year-old male asked:
Dr. Mark Gromisch
Gastroenterology 38 years experience
Bone ingestion: Most bones will pass without difficulty occasionally a bone can get hung up usually at the ileocecal valve. Signs of obstruction are abdominal pain vomiting and bloating
A 17-year-old male asked:
Dr. Mark Gromisch
Gastroenterology 38 years experience
IBS: I would doubt E Colin as a cause. Generally speaking this is either an acute infection or associated with a change in location where there are differen subtypes of E Coli in the environment. IBS is a diagnosis of exclusion. You should be tested tor parasites, celiac disease, IBD food allergies. Try increasing your dietary fiber intake and see if it helps
A 38-year-old female asked:
Dr. Mark Gromisch
Gastroenterology 38 years experience
Allergic reaction: The more times you take a drug like amoxicillin, the greater chance you will develop a drug allergy. Throat swelling or difficulty breathing need to be evaluated in an ER ASAP. Stop the amox and get this checked out!
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