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Dr. Alison Stuebe

Obstetrics and Gynecology
Chapel Hill, NC
21 years experience female

Locations

UNC Maternal Fetal Medicine

Chapel Hill, NC

About

Bio

Dr. Stuebe graduated from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and completed her Obstetrics and Gynecology residency at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. She completed fellowship training in Maternal Fetal Medicine at Brigham and Women’s, and she earned a Masters of Science in Epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health. She is currently a board-certified maternal-fetal medicine subspecialist at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine and an assistant professor of Maternal-Child Health at the Gillings School of Global Public Health. Her research focuses on modifiable risk factors for metabolic disease in the perinatal period, and she has published more than 50 peer-reviewed articles. She serves on the board of directors for the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine and edits the Breastfeeding Medicine Blog. In the clinical arena, she is the Medical Director of Lactation Services for the UNC HealthCare. She works with an interdisciplinary team of faculty and staff in lactation, pediatrics, family medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, clinical and laboratory pathology, general surgery, dermatology, and maternal/child health. Her current research focuses on clinical management of breastfeeding complications and the role of oxytocin in maternal health.

Specialties
Doctors may have more than one area of specialty interest. Board certification in a specialty area means the doctor has completed formal training and has practice experience in that specialty, and has passed the certification examination from the corresponding accredited medical specialty board.

Obstetrics and Gynecology

Doctor Q&A

51 Answers
0 Agrees
The number of answers this doctor has agreed with.
A 30-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
So sorry : ... That she has had to go through such a difficult year. Before trying again, it might be helpful to see a high risk doctor to try to find out why s... Read More
A 26-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Could be...: ... But it's worth seeing a doctor or midwife to help sort things out.
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
It depends...: ... On why your pregnancy is high risk. Ask your doctor to explain what tests are being ordered and why.
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
It could : Thyroid disease includes conditions with both too much (hyperthyroid) and too little (hypothyroidism) thyroid hormone. These pt.
A 22-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Yes: Women ovulate - or make an egg -- about 14 days before they get their period. From about 20 to 14 days before the next period is the time that women a... Read More
A 33-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Yes: A multivitamin is safe to take during breastfeeding.
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Unlikely...: There's lots of blood flow to nipples, so they should be able to heal. A dermatologist may be able to help prescribe a treatment that will held the tr... Read More
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Yes!: It's fine to drink soy milk while breastfeeding.
A 30-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Sure: Some women get irritation from scented panty liners - using unscented or hypoallergenic panty liners can help.
A 28-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Try antihistamine : Dermatographia is caused by histamine - you might try loratidine or cetirizine, or see a gynecologist.
A 29-year-old male asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
1st Dx in pregnancy : Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar that's first noticed during pregnancy. Hormones increase blood sugar levels during pregnancy. If levels get t... Read More
A 25-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Could be...: ... But it depends in what your blood pressure usually runs. Call your OB provider and tell them what you are experiencing.
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Less in, more out...: To lose weight, you need to take in fewer calories than you are using each day. If your baby is only drinking breast milk, you're burning about 500 ca... Read More
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Depends...: ... On what makes a pregnancy "high risk." maternal fetal medicine doctors have extra training in un-routine pregnancy, and an mfm can help sort out ... Read More
A 25-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Keep nursing!: Congratulations on your adoption! the best way to increase your supply is to increase demand. Nursing your biological child more, and/or pumping, will... Read More
A 20-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Try skin-to-skin: To engage your baby's rooting reflex, put her skin-to-skin, lying on her tummy, while you're lying back on some pillows. Babies who are skin-to-skin l... Read More
A 35-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Probably : Hormonal birth control might affect milk supply, so it's best to use a non-hormone method, like a copper iud. Birth control that doesn't have estrogen... Read More
A 38-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
What supplement?: Some herbs interact with medications - it depends on what you are taking.
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Should be...: Very little cortisone from cream on your skin gets into milk. Moms applying cream to their breasts should wipe it off before the next feeding.
A 35-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Un-routine: Pregnancy is a normal part of life -- but if something out-of-the ordinary happens, then a pregnancy may become high risk. Sometimes, a mom has a medi... Read More
A 33-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Good for moms too: Breastfeeding burns 500 calories a day for mom -- which is like running on a treadmill for 45 minutes every day. In addition, moms who breastfeed face... Read More
A member asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
It's a good start: For lupus, it's ideal to go without a flare for at least six months before conceiving. Before you start trying, it's worth seeing a maternal fetal med... Read More
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
It can: Placenta previa means that the placenta is blocking to cervix, which is the opening from the uterus to the vagina. If the cervix starts to open, heavy... Read More
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
It's a team: At most centers, the tech and the doctor work together on ultrasounds. When the tech does the scan, a doctor reviews all the images to make sure thing... Read More
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Helping baby grow : Human placental lactogen is a hormone that directs energy to the baby through mom's placenta. It also increases mom's glucose levels in the second hal... Read More
A female asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
No: Untreated gdm increases glucose levels. Glucose should not cause a false positive drug test.
A 26-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Hard to say: It might help to get an ultrasound to measure the length of your cervix. That's a more objective way to test whether you are at risk for preterm birth... Read More
A 36-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Teach him...: ...Not to bite the breast that feeds him! in all seriousness, most babies don't realize that their teeth can hurt mom. Calmly taking baby off the brea... Read More
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Probably not: There are lots of different things that can make a pregnancy high risk, and most of them are not related to cysts.
A 20-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Saline drops: Nasal saline is your best bet. Cold medicines like sudafed can decrease your milk supply.
A 37-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Yes: Infection is one of the major reasons for preterm birth and ruptured membranes.
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
It depends...: It depends on how much exercise you are getting. If your baby is only drinking breast milk, you're burning about 500 calories a day making milk. In a ... Read More
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Classes & practice : To become an ibclc, you need to attend educational programs and get hands-on experience with moms. To see requirements, check out http://iblce.Org/.
A 21-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Congrats!: Great news! most moms with pcos do well. It's important to start prenatal care, eat a diet rich in whole grains, and aim the gain a heathy amount of ... Read More
A 28-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Nurse a baby: Simply having a baby at breast can induce milk production. Some hormones can help, but they can have side effects.
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Probably...: ... But to reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes, you'll need to continue to eat a healthy diet after your baby's birth. Women who eat a healthy diet, l... Read More
A 36-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Yes...: A couple of doses of Percocet to control pain after a surgical procedure should not be a problem. Feel better soon!
A 24-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Hard to say...: The good news is that you've reached the third trimester -- most babies born after 30 weeks do ok. If your cervix is dilating, the risk of early birth... Read More
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
High risk experience: Mfms are high risk pregnancy experts who do three extra years of training after they finish residency in ob/gyn. They learn how to care for un-routine... Read More
A 29-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Feeding frequency: Several things seem to affect when your period comes back. Moms who breastfeed more frequently and who are thinner generally get their periods back la... Read More
A 38-year-old male asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
It depends: On why the pregnancy is high risk and whether there has been preterm labor. It's best to check with you healthcare provider.
A 31-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Not really: The best way to increase milk supply is to nurse more often. There are some herbs, like moringa, that have been shown to help in certain situations. M... Read More
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
ABM member: The academy of breastfeeding medicine is an international physician organization of doctors dedicated to supporting lactation. Abm fellows have extens... Read More
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
It depends...: ... On how well you manage your sugars. Moms who follow the gdm diet and check their sugar regularly can have average sized babies. Work with your doc... Read More
A 20-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
More Breastfeeding: The best way to increase milk supply is to nurse more often. If this isn't helping, see a lactation specialist to see if there is an issue with your b... Read More
A male asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Yes! : Your milk contains infection-fighting factors that will protect your baby from whatever is causing your fever. It's important to stay hydrated. Motrin... Read More
A 32-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Tylenol (acetaminophen)...: Tylenol (acetaminophen) and Ibuprofen are safe in breastfeeding. Pseudoephedrine lowers milk production, so it's not a great choice. Antihistamines li... Read More
A 32-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Antibiotics...: ... Usually used to treat typhoid are not recommended in pregnancy, but there are safe alternatives, such a ceftriaxone.
A 24-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
Makes sense...: The hormone oxytocin reduces pain, and it's release from the brain by physician contact, like hugging or holding someone you care about. Loving kindne... Read More
A 27-year-old male asked:
Dr. Alison Stuebe
21 years experience
High sugar levels: High sugar levels from mom cross over to the baby, and the baby makes extra Insulin to lower its sugar levels. That Insulin makes baby grow bigger. Th... Read More

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Testimonials
Recommendations and Thank you notes are endorsements given from patients or other doctors.

3
Recommendations
43
Thank you notes
HealthTap member
May 8, 2015
My wife become pregnant last two months. But she has currently widal test positive. what is the medicine do you refer ??
HealthTap member
Mar 31, 2015
Dr. Stuebe is an amazing doctor! #nationaldoctorsday2015 #virtualflower1
HealthTap member
Mar 31, 2015
Dr. Stuebe is an amazing doctor! #nationaldoctorsday2015 #virtualflower1
HealthTap member
Thanks for your quick reply! Many thanks for the quick reply. Very helpful!
HealthTap member
Thank you, your answer was very helpful!
HealthTap member
Thank you, your answer was very helpful!

Education & Training

Medical/Graduate school

Washington University School of Medicine, MO
Graduated 2001MD

Residency

Brigham and Women's Hospital / Massachusetts General Hospital Integrated Residency

Awards

Top Doctor, First Place, Durham Region, NC - Summer
2013
Thought Leader, Second Place, Durham Region, NC - Summer
2013
Top Obstetrician and Gynecologist, Second Place, North Carolina - Summer
2013

Affiliations

Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine
Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine
90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions, provide medical advice, write prescriptions, and more.
Answer emailed
in 24 hours or less