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Dr. George Horng

Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care
San Francisco, CA
21 years experience male

Locations

San Francisco Critical Care Medical Group, Inc.

San Francisco, CA

Address

2351 Clay Street, Suite 501, San Francisco, CA
Directions

Practice website

Fax

4156001414

About

Specialties
Doctors may have more than one area of specialty interest. Board certification in a specialty area means the doctor has completed formal training and has practice experience in that specialty, and has passed the certification examination from the corresponding accredited medical specialty board.

Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care

Pulmonary Critical Care

Languages spoken

English, Mandarin

Doctor Q&A

33 Answers
5 Agrees
The number of answers this doctor has agreed with.
A 29-year-old male asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
20-50%: Studies show highest chance of recurrence in 30 days with 23-50% chance of recurrence over 5 years; smoking increases the risk.
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
038.49: 038.4 septicemia due to other gram-negative organisms 038.49 other.
A 54-year-old male asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
Yes, just stop: Yes, can just stop, no need to taper, no withdrawal associated with aspirin therapy.
A 55-year-old female asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
Yes: Benign means whatever is causing the nodule will not spread. However, the nodule can grow in size, impinge on, or erode into nearby structures and cau... Read More
A 38-year-old female asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
No: Need right heart catheterization to definitively diagnose or rule out pulmonary hypertension.
A 27-year-old female asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
No: The above tests are not sensitive enough. Pulmonary function tests and a high resolution ct scan of the lungs are more sensitive. If they are normal, ... Read More
A 24-year-old female asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
Check lipase: Ask your doctor to check lipase. Elevated lipase supports diagnosis of pancreatitis.
A male asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
Needs follow-up: Scars should not change significantly, so of the abnormality in the lung is growing in size, it needs to be followed-up / further investigated.
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
larger lungs: Lungs filled with air that appear larger than normal but no evidence of pneumonia.
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
many: There can be many causes, the most common after surgery is atelectasis due to poor inspiration. This can be improved by using the bedside incentive sp... Read More
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
No: No, the diaphragm is the muscle that you use when you breathe. The lung is an organ that allows gas exchange.
A 43-year-old female asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
maybe: The lower limit of detection for pet scan is ~1cm. The lung nodules are too small but the axillary lymph node should be large enough for pet scan to d... Read More
A 33-year-old member asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
No rhythm to reset: Shocking the heart resets the electrical system of the heart. In asystole, there is no electrical activity to reset.
A female asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
Yes: Yes, unless you are around other people who are still smoking.
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
Yes: Yes, as long as the lung is normal and healthy.
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
No: Very dangerous to fly on plane with pneumothorax which is the most common cause of "collapsed" lung. The lower air pressure at altitude causes the pne... Read More
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
No: Smoke from any source can cause increased lung damage in patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
less lung: On chest x-ray or ct, there is less lung tissue seen (emphysema) with larger pockets of air in certain areas (bullous).
A 28-year-old male asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
typically no: Typically no unless the stroke affects breathing.
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
depends on severity: It depends on how severe and how long the hypoxia lasted. In general, brain cells have limited regenerative capability.
A 30-year-old male asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
Need CT angiogram: You really need a CT angiogram of the chest to reliably detect pulmonary embolism. IV contrast is needed to see blood clots in the pulmonary vessels. ... Read More
A 52-year-old female asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
No: No, very dangerous if collapse is due to pneumothorax, lower pressure in plane at altitude can make collapse worse.
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
Other way: Bullae can rupture leading to pneumothorax (air outside lung) which can then collapse the lung.
A 31-year-old female asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
Yes: Need good blood flow for pulse oximetry to be accurate. If the hypotension was low enough, could cause pulse oximetry to be inaccurate.
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
Kidneys compensate: Your body tries to buffer the increased carbon dioxide from chronic respiratory acidosis by increasing the bicarbonate (sodium bicarbonate) absorption... Read More
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
no: Shock is a medical term used for low blood pressure. If the blood pressure is high, then the term shock would not be used.
A 35-year-old member asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
? aspiration: These could all be due to recurrent aspiration.
A 34-year-old member asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
should not: The radioactive dye should be sterile and not cause infection. However, if the site of injection is not cleaned properly or the IV used for the inject... Read More
A 37-year-old female asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
yes, ct angiogram: Yes, a ct angiogram of the chest can diagnose pe.
A 47-year-old female asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
not too late: Troponin, a marker of cardiac injury, can stay elevated for 10 days in the blood.
A 23-year-old female asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
Go to hospital: You should seek medical attention ASAP, could be infection with GI bleed, needs to be evaluated.
A 51-year-old male asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
Blood clots: Driving for long periods of time can increase risk of blood clots developing in the legs that can then go to your lungs, need to take regular breaks a... Read More
A 24-year-old female asked:
Dr. George Horng
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care 21 years experience
Unlikely: D-dimer is very sensitive for blood clots. If neg, very unlikely to have blood clot, if positive/high, may have blood clot or something else such as i... Read More

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Testimonials
Recommendations and Thank you notes are endorsements given from patients or other doctors.

2
Recommendations
51
Thank you notes
HealthTap member
Mar 31, 2015
Dr. Horng is an amazing doctor! #nationaldoctorsday2015 #virtualflower1
HealthTap member
Mar 31, 2015
Dr. Horng is an amazing doctor! #nationaldoctorsday2015 #virtualflower1
HealthTap member
Your answer was very helpful! Thanks :) thanks for your time and have a good day.
HealthTap member
Thank you, your answer was very helpful! Thank you for answering my question
HealthTap member
Thank you, your answer was very helpful!

Education & Training

Medical/Graduate school

UC San Diego School of Medicine, CA
Graduated 2001MD

Residency

UCLA / West LA VA Medical Center

Awards

Teacher of
Top Pulmonary Critical Care Intensivist, Second Place, California - Summer
2013

Affiliations

California Pacific Medical Center
San Francisco Crit Cr Med Grp
90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions, provide medical advice, write prescriptions, and more.
Answer emailed
in 24 hours or less