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Dr. David Bicknell

Cardiac Electrophysiology
Columbus, OH
27 years experience male

Locations

Ohiohealth Heart and Vascular

Columbus, OH

Address

Columbus, OH
Directions

My office hours

Thursday: 8:00am - 5:00pm
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Practice website

Insurances accepted

Medicaid

Medicare

No Value

About

Bio

Dr. Bicknell specializes in the treatment of heart rhythm disorders, atrial fibrillation, heart failure disorders and arrhythmia. Dr. David Bicknell is a clinical cardiac electrophysiologist who recently joined Central Ohio Cardiovascular Physicians. He previously practiced in the Chicago area. Dr. Bicknell specializes in the treatment of heart arrhythmias, including atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia. He has advanced training in atrial fibrillation ablation, as well as complex device management, including lead removal. Dr. Bicknell is the only physician in Central Ohio who is board-certified in both Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology and Advanced Heart Failure and Transplant Cardiology. He also is board-certified in Cardiovascular Disease and Internal Medicine. Dr. Bicknell completed two fellowships at University of Kansas Mid-America Cardiology in Advanced Arrhythmias and Ablations and Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology. He completed his residency in Internal Medicine at Loyola University Medical Center http://ohiohealth.com/

Specialties
Doctors may have more than one area of specialty interest. Board certification in a specialty area means the doctor has completed formal training and has practice experience in that specialty, and has passed the certification examination from the corresponding accredited medical specialty board.

Cardiac Electrophysiology

Cardiology

Internal Medicine

Doctor Q&A

2 Answers
0 Agrees
The number of answers this doctor has agreed with.
A 31-year-old female asked:
Dr. David Bicknell
Cardiac Electrophysiology 27 years experience
Regarding : Regarding if pacs ( premature atrial contraction or apds — atrial premature depolarization) can lead to to atrial fibrillation (a fib), the best answer is no. However i will get to one exception. First pacs happen to everyone and sometimes there is no rhyme or reason to how many or when they occur. Most people do not notice them, but since they change the regularity of the heart beat there are times people can feel them. Now afib occurs in certain individuals with risk factors for pressure of volume overload in the heart. So people with coronary disease, valve disease, hypertension, sleep apnea, or other volume/pressure overloading conditions lead to substrate that causes afib. To start afib all you need are triggers that create several or run of premature beats. Usually this is in the form of atrial tachycardia or fast atrial beats from the pulmonary veins. One pac will unlikely cause afib in a susceptible individual. Pacs are common and are not a risk predictor for afib alone. Now regarding metoprolol 25mg, it is a small dose but can be effective depending on the individual. There are 2 forms Metoprolol Succinate ( xl or long acting — 24 hour) and the short acting form call Metoprolol Tartrate which is usally a twice a day medications as it last about 12 hours, but can be prescribed once a day. The medication is a beta blocker and can decrease or eliminate the pacs when you take it. Now if have the pacs in the morning, then take it then but if you have them at night, then take it at night. Now they do cause the heart rate to slow or not respond as fast if you are dehydrated. Drinking alcohol causes dehydration and can make responding to “lightheadedness” slower. Thus you might want to take the medication in the morning if you drink at night. As far as with food, just take it the same way each day, as absorption may be slightly different on an empty stomach. Again see if it causes any effect and discuss it with your pharmacist or physician if needed. I hope this helps. David bicknell, D.O., cardiac electrophysiologist.
A member asked:
Dr. David Bicknell
Cardiac Electrophysiology 27 years experience
Placing : Placing a pacemaker is usually done in about one hour, however it can take less or more time depending on the situation. Pacemakers have been placed by cardiologist for over 30 years by the transvenous approach. This is done by accessing the large vein in the chest using a technique in which the pacemaker leads are placed into the heart through the vein. As long as the veins are open (patent) then the procedure takes about one hour or less. A lot of the time may be preparing the patient and placing the patient in the electrophysiology lab, as well as recovery from sedation. Including this time the total length may be 2 hours, and almost all people spend the night in the hospital. For a battery change the procedure is usually 30 minutes and patients can go home the same day.

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Testimonials
Recommendations and Thank you notes are endorsements given from patients or other doctors.

2
Recommendations
5
Thank you notes
HealthTap member
Mar 31, 2015
Dr. Bicknell is an amazing doctor! #nationaldoctorsday2015 #virtualflower1
HealthTap member
Mar 31, 2015
Dr. Bicknell is an amazing doctor! #nationaldoctorsday2015 #virtualflower1
HealthTap member
Your answer made me feel good! Thanks :) Wish u were my cardio! mine just says your fine and dnt worry, no expl
HealthTap member
Thank you, your answer was very helpful!

Education & Training

Medical/Graduate school

Des Moines University College of Osteopathic Medicine
Graduated 1999MD

Medical/Graduate school

University of Illinois, Chicago
Graduated 1995MD

Medical/Graduate school

University of Illinois, Chicago
Graduated 1994MD

Residency

Des Moines General Hospital

Residency

Loyola University Medical Center

Awards

Chief Cardiology Fellow, Advocate Lutheran General Hospital

Affiliations

Heart Rhythm Society
Heart Failure Society of America
American College of Cardiology
90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions, provide medical advice, write prescriptions, and more.
Answer emailed
in 24 hours or less