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Doctor Q&A for Dr. Jeffrey Buchsbaum

A 18-year-old male asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Buchsbaum
Radiation Oncology 31 years experience
Two parts: Part one: Go to your local, regular MD and discuss the symptoms and see if they can help you. It is statistically most likely an infection of some sort. Part two: Clearly you are worried about cancer and admit in your question you are smoking. It might be reasonable to guess you know you should quit. It is hard to quit..try to get help from the doc too. Having that support really helps success.
A 29-year-old male asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Buchsbaum
Radiation Oncology 31 years experience
Not the biggest risk: Risk of one scan increases your lifetime risk about 0.08%...Low energy scans now even less. Annual from age 25 onward is about 3.8% risk. Older ct's were 1300 mrem...Annual exposure just living is 300 or so...If you live some places it can be 500 or 600 (more rock...Etc.). If it was needed, it likely helped more than hurt. If not needed, we teach to avoid unneeded radiation.
A 53-year-old female asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Buchsbaum
Radiation Oncology 31 years experience
Some good data: Few with positive screens end up with cancer - just to put it in perspective. We need more data, but a quick read of this review suggests that even a positive rarely is associated with cancer.. http://www.ncmedicaljournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/74509.pdf.
A 36-year-old female asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Buchsbaum
Radiation Oncology 31 years experience
In theory anywhere: In theory, it could happen anywhere in the brain, but most juvenile pilocytic astrocytomas are in the supratentorial brain (outside of the posterior fossa). Posterior fossa tumors are typically ependymoma, medulloblastoma in kids. Jpa's don't happen in adults (adults get lgg's, or who ii low grade gliomas..Just almost never who i tumors). Most stem lesions are not jpa's, but they happen too.
A 46-year-old female asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Buchsbaum
Radiation Oncology 31 years experience
Get a consult: With a neurosurgeon. It may actually be wisest to just watch it if you don't have any symptoms as this may simply not grow at all and you may live to the end of your days without the risks of a surgery. One really needs longitudinal imaging and an exam to say more.. Some patients cannot have surgery, etc., so radiation can be useful too.
A 32-year-old male asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Buchsbaum
Radiation Oncology 31 years experience
Fever on agents: This is the classic flu versus bacterial infection or other virus. Colds usually don't give a 103.0, but a flu sure can at it is in full swing here in indiana right now. If safe, getting out to his doctor or an urgent care center may make sense: at least a call to your doctor. Symptoms and signs need to be ascertained (pain, nausea, etc.). He may need some blood work. And, has he had a flu shot?
2 thanks
A 62-year-old female asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Buchsbaum
Radiation Oncology 31 years experience
Poss. Solution: Clearly this is really scaring you as I have seen you post 3 similar/parallel questions about your symptoms. Health tap is a super place, but it cannot replace a real md exam. Go to your doctor and discuss this - if i had something gnawing at me like this, asap. Hormonal issues, brain irritation from your mass, tremor, anxiety, medication issues, stress, too much coffee, and other things.
A 62-year-old female asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Buchsbaum
Radiation Oncology 31 years experience
Need more data: In general, a meningioma is a very slow growing tumor and this is unlikely to all of a sudden happen. Other issues can cause these symptoms (they are relatively non-specific). In theory, i can imaging a scenerio where a mengioma causes an endocrinopathy, and this happens, but that is a major stretch. I would have a very experienced internist evlaluate you and perhaps do some tests.
A 24-year-old male asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Buchsbaum
Radiation Oncology 31 years experience
Not a great idea...: If you just look, you may get an finding that is benign but then is worrisome...Then the team biopsies and then there can be complicaitons ....Have seen this and really awful things happen. I agree with the first answer: get a good exam and look. Now, if you had lung cancer or some cancer that goes to brain (or need a scan as part of a staging work-up..) that is different.
A 16-year-old female asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Buchsbaum
Radiation Oncology 31 years experience
Many variables: Age of patient. Degree of resection (if possible). Histologic grade (how nasty under the microscope). It can be from months for the worth ones to decades or longer for the best. In general, get to a center that has a "team" approach and work forward in that sense. Rules are not perfect: I have had a very reviewed gbm live 10 years and a 3yo with a jpa resected fully pass quickly.
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