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Doctor Q&A for Dr. Brian Sabb

A 24-year-old male asked:
Dr. Brian Sabb
Sports Medicine 25 years experience
Hi, the peroneals sublux over the lateral malleolus (of the distal fibula) at the outside of your ankle. They sublux due to tendon instability and injury of the superior peroneal retinaculum. The longer it goes untreated the greater likelihood of tendon pathology and inflammation: tenosynovitis, tendinitis, and eventually tear. I recommend treatment with a foot surgeon, especially if u have pain
A 24-year-old male asked:
Dr. Brian Sabb
Sports Medicine 25 years experience
Hi, the peroneals sublux over the lateral malleolus (of the distal fibula) at the outside of your ankle. They sublux due to tendon instability and injury of the superior peroneal retinaculum. The longer it goes untreated the greater likelihood of tendon pathology and inflammation: tenosynovitis, tendinitis, and eventually tear. Since you are having pain, I recommend treatment with a foot surgeon.
A 29-year-old male asked:
Dr. Brian Sabb
Sports Medicine 25 years experience
Hi, I recommend discussing with the doc who made ur diagnosis, but in general: first u should limit activities that cause or worsen the pain, for example running. Second apply ice and heat (brief application) alternating. Third use anti-inflammatory if your health will allow that. 4th immobilization such as a orthotic or cam boot. Ultimately u may need PT, injections, or LASTLY surgery.
A 27-year-old male asked:
Dr. Brian Sabb
Sports Medicine 25 years experience
Since there is continued pain 2.5 months after your injury, this is not a simple “sprain” Persistent pain after injury may mean: occult fracture, osteochondral lesion of the talus, or severe ligament injury and ankle instability. I recommend you stop running and see your doctor. She will want XR first and may need MRI. You don’t want to do physio RN, you first need a diagnosis. Good luck
A 50-year-old female asked:
Dr. Brian Sabb
Sports Medicine 25 years experience
Hi, the Radiologist’s interpretation is used to communicate the results in a terminology that the referring doc understands. The bottomline is: right C6 foraminal narrowing according to your radiologist. Now importantly that must be correlated w/ ur clinical symptoms. In regards to treatment, surgery is just 1 of many good options. Usu anti inflammatories, PT, and spinal injections before surgery
A 25-year-old female asked:
Dr. Brian Sabb
Sports Medicine 25 years experience
Hi, Venous ultrasound is the standard imaging test for anyone suspected of having deep venous thrombosis (DVT)/blood clot. This exam can be performed at almost any radiology office or department. An US tech will perform the exam for you. A radiologist will interpret the results. The duplex ultrasound is very reliable especially for proximal (thigh) clots.
A 32-year-old female asked:
Dr. Brian Sabb
Sports Medicine 25 years experience
Hi, the best exam for DVT is non-invasive. Venous ultrasound is the standard imaging test for anyone suspected of having deep venous thrombosis (DVT)/blood clot. This exam can be performed at almost any radiology office or department. An US tech will perform the exam for you. A radiologist will interpret the results. The duplex ultrasound is very reliable especially for proximal (thigh) clots.
A female asked:
Dr. Brian Sabb
Sports Medicine 25 years experience
Hi, first: cam type femoroacetabular impingement = a type of impingement (pinching) at your hip. The cam type has to do with the morphology of the femur side of your hip joint. The cam lesion is a contour deformity of your femoral head/neck junction. Now second: the term subtle is used by the radiologist in your report implying she thinks your cam lesion is small which is better than a large cam.
A 23-year-old female asked:
Dr. Brian Sabb
Sports Medicine 25 years experience
Hi, surgery is a great option if u have an experienced hip specialist. The thing to consider is that u don’t want to ONLY get the labrum repaired. A very important part of the surgery is resection of the cam lesion (this is not fully understood by all docs). If the cam is not removed u will continue to have pain and impingement, get re-tear of labrum, and develop arthritis at an early age.
A 25-year-old female asked:
Dr. Brian Sabb
Sports Medicine 25 years experience
Good question. The old exam may not have been the ideal projection. The best radiograph is modified Dunn view. The lesion may have been smaller on the prior and not every doctor is familiar with the appearance of cam lesion, especially a small cam. Bottomline, if u have cam lesion u should see hip specialist to correlate XR findings with your history and exam and then discuss treatment options
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