U.S. doctors online nowAsk doctors free

Dr. David G. O'Day

Ophthalmology
North Charleston, SC
36 years experience male

Locations

Charleston Cornea & Refractive Surgery

Charleston, SC

Address

574 Lone Tree Drive, Charleston, SC
Directions

Fax

843-856-8953

Insurances accepted

Blue Cross Blue Shield of South Carolina

Aetna

Anthem BC Life & Health Insurance Company

Humana Insurance Company

UnitedHealthcare

Medicaid

Medicare

CHAMPUS

Cigna

Charleston Cornea & Refractive Surgery

North Charleston, SC

About

Specialties
Doctors may have more than one area of specialty interest. Board certification in a specialty area means the doctor has completed formal training and has practice experience in that specialty, and has passed the certification examination from the corresponding accredited medical specialty board.

Ophthalmology

Licenses

United States: Georgia, South Carolina

Doctor Q&A

22 Answers
9 Agrees
The number of answers this doctor has agreed with.
A 35-year-old member asked:
Dr. David G. O'Day
Ophthalmology 36 years experience
Tear film/cornea: The very front part of the eye is responsible for the greatest amount of refraction (or focusing) of light rays entering the eye. Approximately 2/3 of refraction of light rays occurs at the front surface of the cornea, actually at the air-tear film/cornea interface. The tear film coats the surface of the cornea. The other 1/3 of refraction occurs in the crystalline lens inside the eye.
A 36-year-old female asked:
Dr. David G. O'Day
Ophthalmology 36 years experience
Ulcer is serious: A corneal ulcer can be a potentially sight-threatening problem and should be considered as a serious eye infection. Stop the contact lenses and follow your Eye M.D.'s treatment recommendations exactly. The stye is pretty much self-limited, and will be effectively treated with the antibiotic drops you are most likely using for the corneal ulcer. Also do hot compresses to the lids four times a day.
1 thank
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. David G. O'Day
Ophthalmology 36 years experience
Probably not iris: the color change is probably not from damage to the iris. Rather, it could be from damage to the cornea or conjunctiva on the surface of the eyes.

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions, provide medical advice, write prescriptions, and more.

Ask doctors free
Answer emailed
in 24 hours or less

Testimonials
Recommendations and Thank you notes are endorsements given from patients or other doctors.

2
Recommendations
55
Thank you notes
HealthTap member
Mar 30, 2015
Dr. O'Day is an amazing doctor! #nationaldoctorsday2015 #virtualflower1
HealthTap member
Mar 31, 2015
Dr. O'Day is an amazing doctor! #nationaldoctorsday2015 #virtualflower1
HealthTap member
Thank you, your answer was very helpful!
HealthTap member
Your answer made me feel good, thanks!
HealthTap member
This was very helpful. Thanks!

Education & Training

Medical/Graduate school

Georgetown University School of Medicine, DC
Graduated 1985MD

Residency

EMORY UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL EYE CENTER, 1989-92

Awards

Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, 1993-96
90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions, provide medical advice, write prescriptions, and more.
Answer emailed
in 24 hours or less