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Doctor Q&A for Dr. Scott Hacker

A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Scott Hacker
Orthopedic Surgery 24 years experience
Likely Yes: If you have had an injury and cannot bend your knee, something may be stuck inside. If not getting better on its own, sometimes a quick outpatient surgery is the only way to get it going again. I would see your orthopedist sooner rather than later with a stuck knee. Don't let it go.
A 34-year-old member asked:
Dr. Scott Hacker
Orthopedic Surgery 24 years experience
R.I.C.E.: Rest, icing, compression and elevation are the simple first steps to help heal your knee. If still having trouble after a few weeks of this, you will need to see an orthopedist to determine of any serious damage has been done. Try the simple things first. Add in some light strengthening and cardio if all is well on your road to recovery.
A 32-year-old member asked:
Dr. Scott Hacker
Orthopedic Surgery 24 years experience
Yes: You should be concerned if your knee is unstable. This may indicate a ligament injury that will not improve without surgery. Have your surgeon evaluate your knee for ligament damage. Some ligaments will heal and some will not. Avoiding activities that give you a sense of instability will help protect your knees for permanent damage.
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Scott Hacker
Orthopedic Surgery 24 years experience
Unlikely: Jumping barefoot vs jumping with shoes on does not put extra stress on your knee. Of course, landing wrong may hurt something! cushioned shoes will provide some protection to the jarring forces to your knee when jumping. Studies that compare people who wear shoes with those who don't have not shown an improvement with shoe wear in terms of foot/ankle/knee injury.
A 18-year-old male asked:
Dr. Scott Hacker
Orthopedic Surgery 24 years experience
Yes: Your muscles and joints all work differently and can handle different levels of activity. As you don't walk on your arms, lifting weights may cause soreness more quickly than lower extremity strengthening. They are designed for daily use--so use them ! walk / run / stretch / exercise / strengthen !
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A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Scott Hacker
Orthopedic Surgery 24 years experience
Sign of inflammation: 'water' or fluid in your knee usually indicate your knee is 'unhappy' about your activity level. This can often be from arthritis or a meniscus tear. These injuries, either chronic or acute, can create inflammation with activity which in turn, causes the knee to swell. An x-ray or MRI would help give you more information as to the specific causes.
A 25-year-old female asked:
Dr. Scott Hacker
Orthopedic Surgery 24 years experience
Absolutely: Nonoperative treatments like strengthening and therapy are always the first choice before surgery. When you have given these a real effort, and are still bothered by your complaints, then the only real option to get better may be to have the 20 min scope procedure and move on. Give it an honest try and then decide if surgery is right for you.
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A 35-year-old member asked:
Dr. Scott Hacker
Orthopedic Surgery 24 years experience
Wont stop it !: Braces have not been shown to decrease the risk of tearing your acl. They do provide reassurance, but the brace itself will not stop an injury. If desired, you may wear any brace that is comfortable.
A 35-year-old female asked:
Dr. Scott Hacker
Orthopedic Surgery 24 years experience
Nomal: Cracks and pops are normal for knees, as bands of tissue pass over your joint surfaces when they are under normal tension. If these become more significant, or painful, they could signify an arthritic process. Always ask your surgeon about things like this.
A 43-year-old female asked:
Dr. Scott Hacker
Orthopedic Surgery 24 years experience
No it is not: Most people, at 43, do not have osteoarthritis - a wear and tear condition. Rheumatoid arthritis, however, is a condition where the body attacks its own joints leading to damage. This should be followed by a rheumatologist carefully. Most osteoarthritis appears later in one's 60's and 70's.
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