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Dr. Daniel Goldberg

Ophthalmology
Holtsville, NY

Locations

Office

NY

Address

NY
Directions

About

Bio

Daniel E. Goldberg, MD. Medical School: Albert Einstein College of Medicine, NY. 1994 Ophthalmology training: UCSD Medical Center, CA. 2002 Specialty: Vitreoretinal Disease and Surgery. Practice location: 279 Central Park West, New York, New York, 10024. Tel: (212) 362-4440

Specialties
Doctors may have more than one area of specialty interest. Board certification in a specialty area means the doctor has completed formal training and has practice experience in that specialty, and has passed the certification examination from the corresponding accredited medical specialty board.

Ophthalmology

Languages spoken

English

Doctor Q&A

40 Answers
1 Agree
The number of answers this doctor has agreed with.
A 25-year-old member asked:
Dr. Daniel Goldberg
Specializes in Ophthalmology
Color Blindness: Color blindness is a manifestation of a wide array of diagnoses. It may be inherited as in x-linked color blindness (affecting males only) or acquired as in optic neuropathy. A long list of abnormal genetic diseases may cause color blindness including achromatopsia and others. Some forms of color blindness are relative and some are absolute where the patient only sees shades of gray.
A 34-year-old member asked:
Dr. Daniel Goldberg
Specializes in Ophthalmology
Eye Drops: "eye drops" is a term that applies to many different formulations depending on the treatment purpose. The drops contain the active ingredient, say for gaucoma, or antibiotic, or steroid, or antihistamine and added to this is a preservative. Moisturizers/lubricants contain methylcellulose derivatives. Eye drops are safe when used properly according to the advice of an experienced physician.
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Daniel Goldberg
Specializes in Ophthalmology
Diabetic Retinopathy: Diabetes can cause a wide array of visual problems, especially if uncontrolled for prolonged time periods. Cataracts may result from diabetes but the more significant problems to attend to relate to retinal health. Uncontrolled diabetes damages small vessels (arterioles and capillaries) as sugar residues impair their integrity and increase their permeability. This results initially in small retinal hemorrhages and capillary “blowouts” called microaneurysms. These damaged capillaries not only let blood seep into the retina, but also allow the plasma fluid (within which red blood cells live) to seep into the macula, the central portion of the retina, responsible for fine detail vision. Accumulation of this fluid in the macula is called macular edema and the presence of this condition leads to significant visual distortion and blur. Up to this point, these changes are called non-proliferative, background diabetic retinopathy. More severe problems occur later when the eye produces “new blood vessels” (neovascularization) to replace the damaged capillaries and arterioles. Unfortunately, even though the eye wants to correct the problem at hand, the “new vessels” are fragile and tend to break easily and bleed. They actually grow out from the surface of the optic nerve and retina into the vitreous humor, so eye movement may disturb them, bringing about vitreous hemorrhage. It is not easy to see through an eye full of blood. Even worse than this, though, is that these blood vessels tend to contract and bring the retina up with them, causing a tractional retinal detachment. These changes are now known as proliferative diabetic retinopathy (because of the proliferation of new blood vessels) and are associated with progressive, severe vision loss. Luckily, we have excellent treatment options including laser, intraocular pharmaceutical injections and surgery for all stages of diabetic retinopathy (except, perhaps, for end stage, ischemic disease, where so little normal blood flow remains, that intervention is frequently futile). The key to diabetes, however, is prevention and earlier intervention has been proven time and again, through clinical trials and clinical experience, to afford the best visual prognosis in all cases. So if you have diabetes, it is extremely important to maintain close follow-up with an ophthalmologist and vitreoretinal specialist and be examined at least twice yearly.

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Testimonials
Recommendations and Thank you notes are endorsements given from patients or other doctors.

2
Recommendations
60
Thank you notes
HealthTap member
Mar 30, 2015
Dr. Goldberg is an amazing doctor! #nationaldoctorsday2015 #virtualflower1
HealthTap member
Mar 31, 2015
Dr. Goldberg is an amazing doctor! #nationaldoctorsday2015 #virtualflower1
HealthTap member
This was very helpful. Thanks! Very thorough answer, I have blurred vision since I woke this morning and I can't seem to figure out why.
HealthTap member
Thank you, your answer was very helpful!
HealthTap member
Thank you, your answer was very helpful!
90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions, provide medical advice, write prescriptions, and more.
Answer emailed
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