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Dr. Gary Gottlieb

Internal Medicine
Tucson, AZ
48 years experience

Locations

Office

Tucson, AZ

Address

7140 E Rosewood Street, Tucson, AZ
Directions

Practice website

About

Bio

Dr Gottlieb went to Johns Hopkins University and Temple Medical School, and had Medical Residency and Gastroenterology Fellowship at University of Pittsburgh. He was Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh, where he did basic and clinical research for five years. He went into private practice in Cleveland, Ohio, where he was in a large group practice for 19 years. He moved his practice to Tucson, Arizona, in 2004. He is associated with Desert Sun Gastroenterology and Carondelet St Joseph's Hospital where he has served as Chairperson of the Gastroenterology Division. His interests include Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), Gastroesophageal Reflux (GERD) and Diseases of the Liver.

Specialties
Doctors may have more than one area of specialty interest. Board certification in a specialty area means the doctor has completed formal training and has practice experience in that specialty, and has passed the certification examination from the corresponding accredited medical specialty board.

Internal Medicine

Languages spoken

English

Doctor Q&A

48 Answers
9 Agrees
The number of answers this doctor has agreed with.
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gary Gottlieb
Internal Medicine 48 years experience
No: Diarrhea is not a sign of gallbladder disease. Diarrhea can occur in some patients after having the gallbladder surgically removed, due to excessive bile release into the intestines. Sometimes this is temporary and resolves in time. If diarrhea is persistent, it can usually be treated by taking Cholestyramine once or twice daily. You should see your doctor to rule out other potential causes.
A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gary Gottlieb
Internal Medicine 48 years experience
Depends on what kind: Ibs can be diarrhea- or constipation- predominant or mixed-type. Ibs-c can be treated with fiber supplements, stool softeners, mild magnesium-based laxatives, or peg 3350. Ibs-d can be treated with loperamide or prescription drugs. Important to rule out celiac disease, lactose intolerance, or colitis. Dietary treatment includes avoiding stimulants (caffeine), alcohol, and stopping tobacco use.
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gary Gottlieb
Internal Medicine 48 years experience
Usually fatty liver: The most common cause of an enlarged liver is fatty liver, which can be caused by obesity, diabetes, alcohol abuse, pregnancy, and hyperlipidemia. Large liver can also be due to cysts, benign and malignant tumors, and congestion related to right-sided heart failure. Rare causes include blood disorders, thyroid disease, and bile duct obstruction. There are many other possible causes.

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Testimonials
Recommendations and Thank you notes are endorsements given from patients or other doctors.

2
Recommendations
199
Thank you notes
HealthTap member
Mar 31, 2015
Dr. Gottlieb is an amazing doctor! #nationaldoctorsday2015 #virtualflower1
HealthTap member
Mar 30, 2015
Dr. Gottlieb is an amazing doctor! #nationaldoctorsday2015 #virtualflower1
HealthTap member
Thanks so much. Do you have much info on Gastroparesis?I've had it 8years now and have suddenly gained weight?
HealthTap member
Thank you, your answer was very helpful! I believe I have adhesions but can't prove it! No IBS, but PAIN!
HealthTap member
Thanks for your quick reply! Thanks for getting back to me so fast and replied to my question

Education & Training

Medical/Graduate school

Temple University School of Medicine, PA
Graduated 1973MD
90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions, provide medical advice, write prescriptions, and more.
Answer emailed
in 24 hours or less